The Boston Research Center

One of the projects I’ve been working on in various iterations and forms for several years is the Boston Research Center. Our website describes it this way:

“The Boston Research Center (BRC), based in the Northeastern University Library, is a digital community history and archives lab. The mission of the BRC is to help bring Boston’s deep neighborhood and community histories to light through the creation and use of new technologies. Through these technologies, Boston residents can share the underrepresented stories from their community’s past, as well as a deeper understanding of how this past shapes our present.”

My colleague Amanda Rust designed the research and community engagement component to this work. It flips the traditional “Reseach Inquiry” model and instead uses academic resources to explore a topic that originates in one of Boston’s communities. Amanda and our colleague Dory Klein from the BPL hosted focus groups to identify topics, and then worked with community members to co-create a tool/portal/analysis that moves toward a deeper understanding of that topic. Since Amanda’s departure to greener pastures this summer, I’ve taken on a bigger role with the project, and have been able to dig deep into the nitty-gritty of their work. It’s been wonderful to learn more and to watch people interact with what we’ve created in feedback sessions at the Branch Libraries.

News (at) Northeastern recently wrote an article about our work, and I think it’s pretty good. Article text and a direct link to the article follows.


THE HARRIET TUBMAN HOUSE MAY BE GONE, BUT ITS LEGACY IS PRESERVED FOREVER THANKS TO NORTHEASTERN’S LIBRARY

by Cody Mello-Klein November 23, 2022

https://news.northeastern.edu/2022/11/23/boston-research-center-local-history/

The Harriet Tubman House may be gone, but its legacy is preserved forever thanks to Northeastern’s library

The corner of Massachusetts and Columbus avenues used to be something more than a flattened lot. It used to be more than just another in a long line of mixed-use development sites with condos in Boston.

For the residents of the South End neighborhood, it was the Harriet Tubman House. Founded in the early 20th century as an autonomous space for and by Black women on Holyoke Street, in 1975, it became a community center run by United South End Settlements until it was sold in 2019 to help keep the organization afloat. Ultimately, it was demolished.

The house was a fixture of Boston’s Black community, but its century-spanning history–the kind that doesn’t get told in museums or textbooks–was in danger of getting lost with the demolition too. Fortunately, the building’s history and the community’s memories were saved through the hard work of residents who banded together under the I Am Harriet coalition, USES itself and the resources and ingenuity of the Boston Research Center.

young students posing in a computer lab
Students pose for the camera during an after school computer class at the Harriett Tubman House, a community center in the South End that has since been demolished. United South End Settlements records (M126), Northeastern University Library, Archives and Special Collections

Through a unique collaboration between the Northeastern University Library, Boston Public Library and community organizers and leaders, the BRC created the Harriet Tubman House Memory Project to help digitally preserve and tell the history of not only the site but the community that existed around it. And the South End is not the only community in Boston that has been able to work with the BRC to tell its story. The BRC has collaborated with community groups in East Boston and Chinatown to create hubs for innovative archival projects on local history.

“The records of the rich and powerful, institutional records, places with resources and power, tend to get preserved–that’s how it’s been forever,” says Dan Cohen, dean of libraries and vice provost for information collaboration at Northeastern. “For the first time, we are able to rectify the gaps, the truly unfortunate gaps, that happen in historical preservation and access because we have a better view of what is important to save. … And we have new ways of ensuring that we can help to widen access to the world so that everyone can gain access to those materials.”

The project started as a collaboration between Northeastern’s Archives and Special Collections and Digital Scholarship Group and the BPL. Dory Klein, BPL’s community history and digitization specialist, says this kind of public-private library partnership isn’t abnormal, “but it doesn’t happen with as much frequency as it ought to.” 

For Northeastern, the partnership amplifies the reach of the university’s archives, which focus on the history of Boston’s under-represented communities, through the BPL’s more than two dozen branch libraries. For the BPL, it is an opportunity to build web-based projects that would have been impossible without Northeastern’s digital expertise and infrastructure.

In 2018, the project secured an initial $200,000 Mellon Foundation grant to kickstart the project and have since received a $650,000 implementation grant and, most recently, a $505,000 grant to “regularize” the process, Cohen says.

The BRC has launched four projects so far, including the Tubman House project, an interactive public art map/database, the Chinatown Collections Survey Project and Our Home, an online East Boston history portal. The BRC is also working with staff in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities on the Reckonings Project, a local history platform that designed for community activists. Each BRC project begins with conversations with community partners, who each identified a research question or history capture project. The resulting projects are each different because the needs of each community are different. But each requires building deep connections with the communities in Boston, something both Northeastern library and the BPL had a head start with.

Since 1998, the university’s Archives and Special Collections department has been collecting, digitizing and making accessible the history of Boston’s under-represented groups, establishing and maintaining relationships with community-based organizations, local activists and social justice-focused nonprofits in the process. The BRC is built on that foundation.

“In 1998, very little history of Boston’s social movements was accessible to researchers,” says Giordana Mecagni, head of Archives and Special Collections and head of community engagement for the BRC. “Now that a lot of this history is stored safely in the archives, we want to make the history even more accessible, to bring it back into the community by using digital tools and services like the BRC.”

Members of the BRC team from Northeastern along with Klein will sit down with community members and lay out the full suite of options that BRC can provide, from oral histories to Wikidata-based maps. Those conversations always come back to a simple question: What sounds interesting to you?

“We ask them, ‘How do you want to interact with the material? What’s the story you want to tell?’ says Patrick Yott, associate dean for digital infrastructure. “It may not be the same story if we asked a historian of 18th century Boston what they want to tell.”

In the case of the Harriet Tubman House project, a member of I Am Harriet reached out to the BPL, asking if someone could put together an archival memory project. Northeastern already housed the USES’ archives, so it made perfect sense to turn the project into a BRC initiative. The project includes digitized materials from Northeastern’s USES collection, photos of the building taken by the BPL before it was demolished and oral and narrative histories.

Now in its third phase, the BRC is focused on making this infrastructure and process into a regular part of Northeastern and the BPL’s work.

“I think what that means is that we focus on existing archival collections that have already been digitized and described and focus on the toolkit of components and workflows that we’ve developed—and we use those and improve them in small ways so we don’t have to keep investing entirely new systems,” says Julia Flanders, director of Northeastern’s Digital Scholarship Group.

By creating a replicable model of local history preservation, Cohen hopes the BRC’s work can go beyond Boston and connect the libraries and communities around Northeastern’s other global campuses. 

“When you don’t have a complete record, people have a very poor sense of what the actual history of their neighborhood is,” Cohen says. “I think it’s important to surprise and challenge people with the very complex past of their immediate environment. And you can only do that when you really save and provide access to the full spectrum of human experience and expression that has happened in those neighborhoods.”

Boston Phoenix issues now available freely online

In 2015, Stephen Mindich donated the archives of the Boston Phoenix to the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections. Now, a scanned copy of many of the issues are available for free in the Internet Archive.

How we got from A. to B. is the subject of a blog post by Caralee Adams on the archive.org blog. You can read the article at this URL http://blog.archive.org/2021/12/15/boston-phoenix-rises-again-with-new-online-access/ but I’ve also pasted the content below. Thank you Caralee and team!

Some exciting things have happened along the way:

1. I met Brewster Kahle (well, zoom, but still…)

2. Dan Kennedy wrote a really complementary article on his blog Media Nation, which made me blush the color of the Hancock tower’s beacon when it rains. Thank you, Dan. https://dankennedy.net/2021/12/16/after-a-long-delay-most-of-the-boston-phoenix-print-archives-are-now-online/

Boston Phoenix Rises Again With New Online Access

Posted on  by Caralee Adams

For more than 40 years, The Boston Phoenix was the city’s largest alternative weekly in covering local politics, arts, and culture.

The Boston Phoenix, Volume 2, Issue 44 – October 30, 1973

“It was really a pretty legendary paper. The style of the writing and the quality of writers were nationally known,” said Carly Carioli, who started at the newspaper as an intern in 1993 and became its last editor-in-chief.

With the advent of online advertising, it struggled like many independent newspapers to compete. In 2013, the Phoenix folded.

After the publication shut down, owner Stephen Mindich wanted the public to be able to access back issues of the Phoenix. The complete run of the newspaper from 1973 to 2013 was donated to Northeastern University’s special collections. The family signed copyright over the university. 

Librarians led a crowdsourcing project to create a digital index of all the articles and authors, which was helpful for historians and others in their research, said Giordana Mecagni, head of special collections and university archivist. Northeastern had inquired about digitizing the collection, but it was cost prohibitive. 

As it turns out, the Internet Archive owned the master microfilm for the Phoenix and it put the full collection online in a separate collection: The Boston Phoenix 1973-2013. Initially, the back issues were only available for one patron to check out at a time through Controlled Digital Lending. Once Northeastern learned about the digitized collection, it extended rights to the Archive to allow the Phoenix to be downloaded without controls.

Read The Boston Phoenix at the Internet Archive

“All of a sudden it was free to the public. It was wonderful,” Mecagni said. “We get tons and tons of research requests for various  aspects of the Phoenix, so having it available online for free for people to download is a huge help for us.” 

Inquiries range from someone trying to track down a classified ad through which they met their spouse, or an individual looking up an article about a band. The paper was a leader in writing groundbreaking stories about the LGBTQ community, the AIDS crisis, race and the Vietnam War—often issues not covered in the mainstream press. “Making that coverage public is adding an immense amount to the historical record that would not be there otherwise,” said Carioli. He said he appreciates the preservation and easy access to back issues, as do other journalists, researchers and academics.

“It’s a dream come true,” said Carioli of the Internet Archive’s digitization of the newspaper. “The Phoenix was invaluable in its own time, and I think it will be invaluable for a new generation who are just discovering it now. It was a labor of love then and the fact that it’s online now is huge for Boston, but also for anyone who’s interested in independent media and culture.”

Neighborhood Matters, lunchtime film and lecture series

Neighborhood Matters, 2014

In 2014, Bree Edwards and I founded a lunchtime film and lecture series called Neighborhood Matters, to “celebrate the ways in which community groups have shaped the neighborhoods surrounding the Northeastern campus.” It was intended to be a chance for students, faculty, and community members to meet, share some takeout from the delicious Haley House Bakery and Cafe´, and learn about various aspects of our communtities’ history.

I often joke that my goal was to start an event series that required almost nothing, “All I have to do is pop the VHS tape in and press play!”** But Bree really hepled shape the series into something more– an intentional space without an us/them; one that uses food as a connector, and conversations that bridge gaps and promote mutual understanding. We have attempted to keep this up even after Bree’s career path took her elsewhere.

The guest speakers/commenters/presenters we’ve asked to come to campus have been superstars. Each has openly shared their nuanced and vast understanding of the topic at hand while also being incredibly patient with our students. The 2014 series (flyer pictured above) featured Mel King, Carmen Pola, and John Barros! What a lineup.

I’ve been assembling a little digital collection of our Neighborhood Matters posters, and you can see it here. Enjoy. https://repository.library.northeastern.edu/collections/neu:ww72bs340

**please note that this was a pragmatic choice– at the time I had one employee, a lot of technical debt to deal with, and an archive to run.

Against Our Vanishing– Jackson Davidow in the _Baffler_

Jackson Davidow was a 2020-2021 New England Regional Fellowship Consortium awardee, working in our University Archives and Special Collections and several other member archives He recently published an article in the Baffler that draws from his archival research on Gay art and politics in 1970s Boston including the newly publicly available Gay Community News. It is a wonderful read.

https://thebaffler.com/latest/against-our-vanishing-davidow

When I had been dancing for hours, hugging briefly one woman then another, jumping up and down, music blasting—Patti LaBelle, “Voulez-vous couchez avec moi / ce soir”—a moment would come when I would feel ecstatic with love for everyone, every single one of us, all of us lesbians together, even if I didn’t have anyone to go home with.

Globe article about METCO– B.E.A.T.

March 13, 2021 Boston Globe

In March, I got an email from the director of communications at METCO that said:

A bit more than a year ago, you played a crucial part in METCO’s pilot youth leadership program, B.E.A.T. You helped to shape the curriculum, you hosted a few high schoolers as they spelunked into your institutions’ treasures, and you met the students to share your stories and wisdom (in person or via Zoom).

The project that resulted has just been celebrated in the Sunday Boston Globe, and I wanted to make sure you saw it. You were a crucial part of their journey, which is now reaching a wider audience.

METCO (the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity), is a uniquely Boston institution. It started as a desegregation program in the 1960s whose aim was to invite predominantly white suburban schools to host Boston’s children of color– voluntarily. 55 years later, METCO’s programs still vibrant, largely because the 1974 decision only desegregated Boston _proper_, not the region, a fact often lamented by Boston’s education activists.

We love supporting youth programs including METCO and their aim to empower teens by promoting a better understanding of our City’s past.

Mapping Feminist Cambridge

Mapping Feminist Cambridge events, 2021

I’m going to start collecting miscellaneous rad* things that Molly and her reference team at work have participated in, either by contributing photographs, helping aid with research, etc. The first I’m sharing is from the Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women’s “Mapping Feminist Cambridge.” Description follows:

Mapping Feminist Cambridge is a series of historic tours focused on the feminist movement in Cambridge from the 1970s–1990s. From the takeover of 888 Memorial Drive, to the formation of the first domestic violence shelter on the East Coast, to one of the earliest feminist bookstores, to the home of the earliest women’s studies courses – Mapping Feminist Cambridge is a vibrant account of feminist organizing and politics. Each tour spans several organizations and provides context about the movement and its priorities including abortion access, racial equity, women in film and print, healing for survivors, lesbian and bisexual visibility, political collectives, and so much more.

https://cambridgewomenscommission.org/mapping/index.php

Our archives has some pretty rich Boston-based feminist organizational collections and some great personal papers collections from women who may/may not consider themselves feminist but are still rad.* Sophia Smith and Schlesinger are obviously much more focused and collect nationally, but our collections have a hyper-local and grassroots perspective that both community members and scholars love to dig into. Here’s a link:

https://archivesspace.library.northeastern.edu/repositories/2/classification_terms/21

*Rad is my 11 year daugher’s top complement. It might have something to do with the book given to her by Auntie Beck and Uncle Mike when she was little, “Rad American Women, A-Z” that she has read cover to cover several times. She called me “rad” in my latest mother’s day card. She must really love me. ❤

The Katz Tapes

Photograph depicting audiotapes of interviews with Linda Ronstadt, Willie Nelson, Allen Toussaint, Tom Petty, Seal, Ike Turner, Nancy Wilson

One of the more fun projects I have been working on is a collection of audiotaped interviews of local and national musicians recorded by Real Paper and Boston Herald reporter Larry Katz.

We have been working with Larry, Tom Blake and co. at the Boston Public Library, expert audio reformatting studio George Blood Audio LP, the Internet Archive and various Library teams to make these tapes available to the public. Our short-term goal is to upload the files to our digital repository and apply accurate metadata to each record. Our medium-term goal is to transcribe the interviews (crowdsourcing this may be an option), so as to provide deep access to the collection and its contents. Loftier goals may include using Wikidata to interoperate with with the Arthur Freedman collection at Harvard and the other private (David Bieber Archives) and institutional collectors interesting in celebrating Boston’s music and arts history. This lofty goal makes my 1990s and 2000s-era music nerd heart sing.

Larry and his collection was recently featured in a Boston Globe article. You can click on the image above to read a .pdf of the article which includes a couple of quotes from me, one of which is what my former Lexicographer better half calls a “colorful colloquialism.” Those who know me IRL know that this isn’t an unusual occurence, it’s just odd to see one appear in a national newspaper.

Larry was also interviewed by Dan Cohen for his “What’s New” podcast. It’s a great listen.

Boston Phoenix 1974! finished!

Since I last posted, the Zooniverse volunteers made short work of all of the card files we posted for the Phoenix 1974! project, and we find ourselves without any more cards to give them. But naturally, the project is far from finished. We need to download, parse, (edit?) and make the data useful to all. Here is a sneak preview of a set of 1974 author cards–the first set they completed.

One day I’ll learn how to embed Airtables, but in the meantime, click on the image and it will go to the view.

I want to publicly thank all of the folks that contributed to this project. I am completely in awe of their dedication and attention to detail, and look forward to making this mountain of data they created into a useful, publicly available format. My little COVID archival data experiment initially was scoped small (1500 cards!), but grew and grew and grew, and their enthusiasm and appetite for more never wavered. I’m also looking forward to putting together additional crowdsourced projects in the future to take what’s hidden and expose it to the world.

Here is a little spreadsheet showing how many cards per year the volunteers completed, which is a grand total of (drumroll, please) 144,656 cards!

YearAuthor cardsSubject cards
19731025
19741504411
197511611132
19761390798
197715631285
19781609692
197918281179
19801712480
19811835305
19821564447
1983152423(1983-1986)
19841899
19851739
19861530
19871583
19881938
19892230
19901778
Total294126752
Grand Total36164(typed 4 times)144656

We acquired the Boston Globe’s Archives (in 2019)

Northeastern University Archives– Boston Globe

I nabbed my first ‘real’ archives job in 2002, and have done pretty much every aspect of archival labor since– reference, processing, records management, fund raising, accessioning, preservation (digital and analog), outreach, events, and in recent years, managing an amazing team that does all of that work far better than I ever did. In addition to management, my main role since 2008 has largely been acquisitions.

Acquisitions is tricky, finicky work that requires a lot of ‘people’ skills– honesty, empathy, credibility, trustworthiness, persistence, and persuasiveness– and essential for an Archives without a collections budget. But even the most experienced archivist with years of skills, experience, and success can just swing and miss.

I started working with the Boston Globe with advising them on what to do with their Archives in March 2016, and we had a preliminary gift agreement in place by May of 2017. The collection was packed, shipped via trailer truck by June. (This was an intense process, managed excellently by collections archivist, Daniel) After the ink dried on the agreement and the collection was in storage, I started planning a celebration to be as big as the collection– 4376 cubic feet– including a press release sent to listservs, a short video announcement, a lecture series with our Journalism department, etc. Plans, interviews, etc.

The back of the photograph

And then for reasons that had little to do with the Archives, all of the announcing, profile-raising, and celebrating (not to mention the related fundraising opportunities), vanished. Swing and a miss.

In the intervening years, the collection has proven to be a wild success. It is heavily used both for research and for teaching, as well as by the Globe’s own staff. We are thrilled to provide access to this extremely unique slice of Boston and Massachusetts history. The acquisition was, by all accounts, a home run. But if you google “Northeastern Archives and Special Collections acquires Boston Globe Archives” there are no results that mention that this pretty significant event happened. This, is the miss.

This blog is a place for me to put things I don’t want to forget, thoughts not ready for prime-time, and my personal opinions. Somewhere between the three of these is the language we put together about the acquisition. It follows.

____________________________________

Boston Globe Donates Archive to Northeastern University Library

The Northeastern University Library’s Archives and Special Collections is pleased to announce the addition of the Boston Globe library archive to Northeastern’s diverse and growing Boston history collections. The Globe archive is a vast collection comprising more than one million photographs, 5.6 million negatives, and decades of clippings from the Globe and other local and national newspapers. The material was used extensively by Globe staff at the newspaper’s previous iconic location on Morrissey Boulevard in Dorchester.

“It is tremendously exciting to add the Boston Globe to Northeastern’s expansive collections that richly document the city and region. I grew up reading the Boston Globe, and as it was for me, so it was for millions of people an incredible record of Boston’s history and culture,”  said Dan Cohen, Vice Provost of Information Collaboration and Dean of Libraries.

Northeastern is an excellent match for the Globe’s archives. As Northeastern’s Distinguished Professor of History emeritus William M. Fowler, Jr., observed, “Since 1872 the Boston Globe has observed and recorded the history of this community. Its voice has been heard in times of depression and war, its pages have recounted moments of joy and sadness. The Globe archive tells the story of the people and institutions who have created the world in which we live. This collection is a powerful prism through which we can examine and reflect on the past, and by such reflection we can come to a better understanding of our own identity.”  

The Library’s strong record of extensive teaching and research support on campus and in the community through archival outreach initiatives and programming make this collaboration a natural partnership and research opportunity for all Bostonians and those interested in Boston’s history, as well as in the Globe’s outstanding coverage of national and global events, history, and culture. The collection is already available for research; archival class sessions with students from Journalism, English, History, and Landscape Architecture departments, to name a few, have used the Globe’s published photographs and clippings to enrich their studies of Boston’s development and hone their storytelling skills. 

The Archives and Special Collections hold several other news-related collections, including the Gay Community News (1973-1992), the East Boston Community News (1970-1989), and the Boston Phoenix (1965-2013). The department has a decades-long history of collecting and making available the records of Boston-based community based organizations and activists, such as Freedom House, the Chinese Progressive Association, ACT/UP Boston, and Inquilinos Boricuas En Acción. 

With the addition of the Globe, the Northeastern University Library furthers a commitment to building dynamic research collections relating to the city of Boston, its history and development. Head of Special Collections and University Archivist Giordana Mecagni said, “Adding the Globe’s collection to our already existing range of Boston-focused collections marks an exciting new era for the University Archives and Special Collections department. We are already well known for our Boston-based activist collections, and have had visitors from all over the country and abroad coming to Northeastern to research. Adding the Globe brings the Archives to a whole new level. We are now a one-stop shop for researching the Boston experience—its people, places, institutions—from both the Globe’s meticulous and comprehensive city documentation perspective and from the activism of its under-represented groups. Bringing the Globe’s content to a research-focused institution like Northeastern opens up a whole new world of opportunity for scholarship, both on-campus and around the world.”  

For more information about the collection go to this helpful resource put together by Daniel and a team from the Library : https://globe.library.northeastern.edu/using-the-collection/

For more information about how the collection has been used, go to this wonderful blog post by Molly https://librarynews.northeastern.edu/?p=275183

Boston Phoenix 1974! Zooniverse Project

In July 2020, I launched a ‘citizen science’ crowdsourcing project that aimed to create an index to one year of the Boston Phoenix. TL;DR, so far, 2400+ volunteers have typed 115,000 index cards from 1974 all the way to 1987. To say it has exceeded my expectations is an understatment. The following is the text of a post I wrote for the University Library’s blog when we first launched the project. If after reading it you are interested in learning the nuts and bolts of how this project was created and the status as of today, here is a link to a presentation I made at Northeastern’s Digital Scholarship Group open office hours. Please note: all of this is a work in progress– and includes the appropriate amount of problems and typos and unknowns– but goes over the details of my unexpectedly popular COVID project.

_______________________________

Archives and Special Collections Teams with Zooniverse to Crowdsource Boston Phoenix Index

by Giordana Mecagni, July 28, 2020

For nearly 50 years, The Boston Phoenix was Boston’s alternative newspaper of record, the first word on social justice, politics, and the arts and music scene. Its intrepid journalists tackled issues from safe sex and AIDS awareness to gay rights, marriage equality, and the legalization of marijuana. Ads for roommates, romantic mates, and band mates—one could find all these and more in the newspaper’s probing, irreverent, entertaining pages. It ceased publication in March 2013, but in 2015 was preserved for posterity thanks to owner Stephen Mindich’s decision in September to donate the paper’s archives to the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections (NUASC).

Screenshot of the Boston Phoenix 1974! Zooniverse Project page

Today, NUASC launches Boston Phoenix, 1974!, a new project that aims to make The Boston Phoenix’s content more accessible to researchers. Using Zooniverse, Boston Phoenix 1974! (left) will recruit an army of volunteers to create an index to The Boston Phoenix. Participants will be re-typing a large set of index cards that once helped Phoenix reporters find past articles. Volunteers will have the opportunity to take a deep dive into the arts, culture, politics, and topics of vital importance to Bostonians in 1974 by encountering articles such as “The Winning Ways of Mike Dukakis,” “Kissinger: Financing the Death of a Government,” “Lifestyles: Conversing with Lesbian Mothers,” “Changes ahead for Cambridge Rent Control,” or “Garrity on Busing: No Delaying Tactics.” The nonprofit Zooniverse offers this platform to connect professional researchers with 1 million+ volunteers in order to enable research that would not be possible, or practical, otherwise.

Index card from a 1974 issue of the Boston Phoenix

For any researcher visiting NUASC to research Boston’s political, cultural, and social history between the 1970s through the early 2000s, The Boston Phoenix is always recommended as a primary resource, and it is widely used both for research and teaching. Pre-COVID, NUASC staff had previously digitized January-June 1974 of The Boston Phoenix for preservation purposes (right). These issues are now available, and provide a prime opportunity for revisiting this year—one filled with civil unrest, racial violence, and ubiquitous activism.

NUASC is offering this free (and fun!) activity for use in homes and classrooms across greater Boston (and nationally through the Zooniverse’s already-established volunteer network) in order to build a community of support—people who will be inspired to read articles they have transcribed and write about them on their favorite social media platform. When complete, the index will become a way for researchers to quickly pinpoint articles without having to browse whole issues. Ultimately, NUASC hopes to raise $250,000 to digitize the entire collection.

For information about the complete contents of NUASC’s collection of the Phoenix and some brief background information, please go to our portal page.

The Boston Phoenix masthead