Teaching with Archives

 

The 2020 Northeastern University Library Supporter’s newsletter is chock full of things that the University Archives and Special Collections have been involved in over the past year;  the Boston Research Center, The Holocaust Awareness Committee digital collections online, the COVID-19 Archive, the Boston Globe photo archive display tours, but what I am most proud of is our community-embedded Teaching with Archives program, stewarded by the fabulous Molly Brown. Here is the article from the newsletter. The whole newsletter is attached as a pdf at the end.


On any given day in the Northeastern University Library Archives and Special Collections, you could find a Northeastern student, a National Parks Service Ranger, a Boston Public Schools high schooler, or a Greater Boston community member visiting for a class using primary sources. The classes, workshops, and experiences offered by the Archives are a result of the Teaching with Archives program led by Molly Brown, the Reference and Outreach Archivist, and Regina Pagani, the Arts, Humanities, and Experiential Learning Librarian. Teaching with Archives classes equip participants to locate, read, and engage with primary sources such as meeting minutes, correspondence, photographs, local newspapers, and more related to the history of Boston’s social justice organizations as well as Northeastern University’s history. The Boston Public Schools (BPS) continue to include the Teaching with Archives program in their curriculum educating high school juniors about Boston’s school desegregation history. The BPS students visit the Archives to learn more about the long history of education activism and find primary sources to incorporate in a chapter they are writing about an activist. Students are asked to consider their chapter as a way of contributing to popular historical records about desegregation, and expanding it by embedding community informed archival records in their telling of an activist’s life. The sessions taught by Brown and Pagani emphasize experiential learning and encourage reflection about the participants’ own role in history, how their neighborhood, school, and beyond are part of the story of Boston’s past and present. They welcome anyone interested in learning from the Archives and Special Collections’ records. Find more about the Teaching With Archives program at https://library.northeastern.edu/archives-special-collections/services/teaching-with-archives 


For the third year this summer, the National Parks Service’s youth program “Historias de Boston” will return to the Archives and Special Collections to kick off their Latinx cultural heritage documentation project. Historias de Boston is a new youth employment program from the National Parks of Boston designed to engage youth in exploring the connections of the Latinx communities of Boston throughout the city’s history. At their sessions with Reference and Outreach Archivist Molly Brown, the Historias de Boston team listens to oral histories from the Archives as a group and explores materials from the Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción records and the Carmen Pola papers to think creatively about what Latinx history in Boston looks like in archival records, and how they could contribute to our understanding of the past. The session in the Archives and Special Collections helps direct and empower the students as they go out to begin collecting their own history. During the 6-week program, students research and gather stories within the three different sites of the National Parks of Boston and the Boston Latinx Community. Their final

project results in a group video project as well as personal video reflection which are all deposited and preserved in the archives. You can find the past two years of Historias de Boston stories deposited to the Archives at https://latinxhistory.library.northeastern.edu/historias-de-boston

2020_supporters_newsletter_-_web_optimized_file

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