LEEDh: Leadership in Engaged and Ethical DH Projects #d4d

LEEDh is also a fancy speaker company

To be LEEDh (Leadership in Engaged and Ethical DH) Certified, projects must:

  • Fill a community need.  Involve the community, at the beginning, at all points along the course the project, and the community must own the project at the end.  
  • Include academics who commit to:
    • Understanding community values by listening with their mouths shut
    • Acknowldedge that they are not in charge of people’s memories
    • Recognizing that there will be pain, and that pain is personal growth, pain is accountability in action
    • Answering the question “Will this project benefit from having what we bring to the table? Or should I just provide $$ because the community is perfectly capable of running the project, all they need is resources?”
  • Analyze and disclose the social impact of access and use, exposure and creating vulnerabilities in the community.  
  • Encourage self-determination of communities, as colonization/power structures can be maintained and transmitted into a digital format. 
  • Include an Accountability practice that specifically defines who the project is accountable to, and what success looks like to that entity
  • Begin with a relationship and end with a better relationship.  If the academic partner intends to sunset the project, they must leave knowledge, infrastructure, community leaders behind.
  • Be used for community understanding and results in community change (as defined by the community) especially when discussing a painful event/period.
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“Community Engaged” projects

community-engagement
Gross corporate “community engagement” image from the internet. Who wears a suit while gardening?

During the #d4d Design for Diversity Conference, Case study presenters talked about developing DH projects that are ethically embedded in the community.  Wanting to learn a little more about the topic, I googled around and found guidelines for both “Community Engaged”  and “Ethically Community Engaged” projects. Both had similar types of mild suggestions, such as ‘humility,’ ‘mitigating harm,’ ‘engaging across boundaries’ and ‘respecting self-determination.’ Obvious, right?

What was missing from the reports and guidelines I skimmed was any perspective from the impacted community ‘partner.’   Are they not asked for feedback?

The exception was in this “Characteristics of quality Community-Engaged Scholarship” from Pepperdine (this report is worth reading), but is just a citation.Ethical

It looks like this book  “Service-Learning Through Community Engagement:What Community Partners and Members Gain, Lose, and Learn From Campus Collaborations”
by Lori Gardinier might shed some light on the community’s perspective, so I will put it on my list of books to read at some point.

#d4d case study presenters and conference attendees had some interesting ideas about forming an ethical community engagment certification (like LEED!) program.  I have collated them and will post later.